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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
on whether she has left america's foreign policy in stronger or weaker position. most think the future lies with china than the u.s. it's not all mrs. clinton's fault. but the fact is we just don't have the influence we used to have around the world from syria to mali, we have led from behind, so in effect the former secretary of state has helped manage our decline in what looks increasingly like a post american world. and that's the memo. now on to the top story. another view on this, joining us now from new york, fox news contributor julie ragenski and former advisor to frank lautenberg and president rosenberg a center left think tank and campaign advisor to president clinton. all right, simon, tell me, where did i go wrong there on judging mrs. clinton? highly intelligent, global celebrity. >> yep. >> incredible run from first lady to senator to secretary. why was this a great tenure as secretary of state? >> first of all agrow agree with the negative characterization. i think we are safer today in the world than when barack obama took office. i think there have within two central legaci
the speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. if it's carried out, i will resist it. in march 2008 you said, quote, here the term "quagmire" could apply. >> what are these? the full bright hearings? i lived through them? this is kind of like a 1970s movie where you go back into the past where it never even happened. why is he fighting with him about vietnam. >> it's interesting. he's fighting with him over iraq but it seems to be vietnam. he seems to be mad that hagel took issue with him about iraq and compared it to vietnam being the big blunder, which, of course, hagel and mccain both served in. when mccain talks about iraq, he only wants to talk about it from the surge on. it's as if everything before that didn't happen and didn't count and we ask still debate whether it worked or not but the big decision is whether it was as big as vietnam. and he didn't want to have that argument. >> he dug into his ankle here and he wouldn't let go. let's listen again. back again to the old war. >> were you co
campaign issue. but it wasn't. mitt romney wouldn't even concentrate on it during the foreign policy debate. the truth is the assassination of the ambassador and three other americans by terrorists in libya has not engaged in the american people. president hillary clinton know that they also know that the national media adores them. and that's a fact. that's the memo. now for the top story tonight, there is no question 60 mince interviews would a big win for president obama and secretary clinton. they got great pr out of it. joining us from washington is senior political analyst brit hume. yesterday i you told chris wallace that you think hillary clinton should not be described as that great secretary of state. why? >> well, first of all, it's no, not easy to be a great secretary of state. foreign policy is a province really of the president. the secretary of state is the person who is his emissary and he is expected to direct the diplomats to carry it out. so that's point one. point 2 is, that she has worked very hard. she has traveled all over the place. set some record, some 112 countrie
of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> when given a chance to respond, here is what hagel said. >> the comment i made about the most dangerous foreign policy decision since vietnam was about not just the surge, but the overall war of choice going into iraq. >> that point found broad support in our latest nbc news/"wall street journal" poll with nearly 6 in 10 americans saying the entire iraq war was not worth it. let's remember that the mccain/hagel grudge goes way back to comments, well, like these. >> well, i think our invasion and occupation of iraq represents one of the great blunters of american history, and we will pay a high price for this for a long time. >> now, that would be in march 2008. you remember, it's the year that barack obama won his first term as president defeating none other than john mccain. do you think mccain is still angry that hagel backed obama? holding a judge? no, never. if mccain played the betrayed besty, fellow republican lindsey graham took the role of disappointed dad over his r
in moving people to see some of the backroom dealings of u.s. foreign policy. it has exposed people to think harder. i do think it played a role in leading people in tunisia and egypt to look at some of the cables and see what people already knew in their gut the soccer field in wikileaks about the alliances between u.s. foreign policy with the most repressive elements in those countries. let's hope that changes as the uprisings continue. anytime you can learn more about what is being done in our name, it is critical. that is part of what transparency is about. the freedom of information act is still not working well under the obama administration. some of that is pos/t 9/11. in los war will lead to a decline in information transparency access. anytime you can have less sequence -- secrecy, that is good. less secrecy is needed. it was handled at the outset by partnering with newspapers like "the guardian," traditional newspapers of distinction. wikileaks released documents around the world to newspapers in india, haiti, the middle east, latin america. it has had an impact in countries we do
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
croft was pointing out in the interview, saying they had no major foreign policy accomplishments, major ones, that is, that they could hold high was his question in the first four years. will that change for kerry? will that be different in this second term with hillary clinton gone? >> i think there are some openings for the obama administration that weren't there in the first four years. you know, we're out of iraq. we're going to be out of afghanistan, our troops out of afghanistan at the end of next year. i think there are going to be some foreign policy challenges with iran and syria and libya and who knows where. and maybe a little bit more of an opening for foreign policy. we also know that presidents in their second term, they tend to turn to foreign policy in those final two years when it is so hard to get things through congress. so i would say, you know, and he's got a secretary of state who's very experienced in john kerry and who also has a relationship with barack obama. >> is there anything he can't do now that secretary clinton will be -- again, friday is her last day. w
dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. if it's carried out, i will resist it. in march 2008 you said, quote, here the term quagmire could apply. >> what are these, the fulbright hearings all over again? i lived through them. and this guy is going back into some "last year at marienbad" kind of weird 1970s movie where you go back into the past that never even happened. why is he fighting hagel over vietnam? >> well, it's interesting because he's ostensibly fighting with him over iraq, but it immediately becomes over vietnam. he seems to be mad that hagel took issue with him about iraq and compared it to vietnam being the big blunder, which, of course, mccain and hagel both served in. you know, when mccain talks about iraq, all he wants to talk about is from the surge on. it's as if everything before that didn't happen and didn't count, and we can still debate whether the surge worked or not, but the bigger issue is whether iraq was as bad as vietnam, and he doesn't want to have that argument. >> here is mccain sinking his teeth into hagel's ankle here, and he w
secretary of state. why? >> well, first it's not easy to be a great secretary of state. foreign policy is a provence of the president. the secretary of state is his emmisary and directed to direct diplomats to carry it out. that is point one. point two, she worked hard, traveled all over the place but the list after chiefment that's can be attributed to her is not long and it's not major. i mean, how well has it reset with russia worked down that she was involved in start something how are things before arabs and israelies? how about iran, north korea. have they been halted? no. i don't think so. you look around for a clinton doctrine has she articulated a new way of think something i would say not. what about major treaties? has she engaged in negotiations that led to the signing of major treaties or any major treaty? the answer to those questions appears to be no. these are the things that might put you in the category that might put you in the category of great secretary of state. she's worked hard zrk her home work, but great? i don't think great. >> bill: you left out the arab spr
't manage to put benghazi into the broader context of the president's weak foreign policy which i'll be important to them when they deal, for instance with the hagel nomination. so it was score one for hillary and i think it was an attempt to build on that and move beyond it and talk about her legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. because, during the hearing, what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary, on benghazi and the democrats weren't. but, both sides kept on saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. and here's some of the points that have been brought up, some of her accomplishments. she helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya, to topple muammar qaddafi. she helped assembly the coalition that imposed the toughest sanctions ever on iran. and, she established diplomatic ties with burma. question, brit: how do you rate hillary clinton's performance, record as our top diplomat. >> i think those examples you cited would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to
mean, there are some big foreign policy issuehas that we're facing out there that didn't get touched you are right. vicki mentions egg legacy. piece of our time. which any written will remember as neville chamberlain's fame mutt comment coming back from the munich dealer hitler most begotten phrase whatsoever. it is astonishing to it me that that quote even is inadvertently and said in a different context slipped through the fact checkers and speech writerred and kno-ho-co in the mainstream media noted. >> i did. >> now there is "newsweek" magazine which is an online only publication i guess you would call it second coming. searches have long complained president obama thinks that of himself. now call they have made it official i guess. >> he was treated as messiah figure the first time around. the media put too much faith in politics and government it reflect their particular ideological bias. they really -- they are setting him up for a no fail secondin term. they are not going to hold him accountability didn't held him accountable in the. racist. viewer for the coverage of the "th
he is going to give his manifesto on what republican foreign policy should be. that's going to be next week on ronald reagan's birthday, rand paul. but, you know, it's fitting, because we're coming up on reagan's birthday. and did you hear about the horrible obama muslim marxist thing about his kenyan home? did you hear? >> this is one wall that probably shouldn't be torn down. this apartment building used to be the home of a young ronald reagan. it was denied landmark status, and the university of chicago is ready to demolish it. the university is also trying to become the site of president obama's presidential library. that's drawing strong concerns the university might turn president reagan's former house into a parking lot for an obama library. >> did you hear about that? chicago close ties with the obamas, all of them, tearing down ronald reagan's boyhood home in order to make a parking lot for barack obama's presidential library. did you hear? did you hear? see, here it is on drudge. reagan's home could become parking lot for obama library. here it is on something call
to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think to in really don't need today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propose and made the decision, i would do that and here is what they
to be devoted to? but -- what is this 15 minutes going to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think -- you really don't need to in today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propos
too difficult, and they become foreign policy presidents in part because they have so much more leeway. but for barack obama, i think this happened early. >> tay, we got the obama plan for leaving iraq... >> president obama announced the current phase of the war is coming to an end... >> narrator: early on, obama had set a timetable for withdrawing troops from iraq. >> within 19 months... >> he came into office promising to get out of iraq. his rise had a lot to do with his opposition to the iraq war. and i don't think he ever looked back. >> narrator: but there was another, secret side to obama's approach to the world. candidate obama had been critical of much of the bush administration's top secret war on terror. as president, it was a different story. >> his people made it clear that in the terrorism arena, he was going to be as tough if not tougher than the bush people. he was going to be extraordinarily aggressive. he and his people reviewed all existing ongoing cia covert operations and with the exception of aggressive interrogations, endorsed all of them, and doubled down on a n
foreign policy issues that we're facing out there that didn't get touched. >> you're right, and one vicky mentions legacy and i think it was joe poll lack of breitbart news was the first to notice the words peace in our time a and. >> yes, absolutely. >> and chamberlain and coming back from the munich deal with hitler, and most misbegotten and it slipped by the fact checkers and-- >> nobody noticed and-- >> i did. >> jon: and now newsweek magazine, which is an online only publication, i guess you would call it. the second coming. now, conservatives have long complained that president obama thinks that of himself, but now, cal, they have he' made it official, i guess. >> he was treated the first time around and i think the media put too much faith in politics and government because it reflects their particular ideological bias and they really -- they're setting him up for a no-fail second term. they're not going to hold him accountable and didn't hold him accountable in the first term and afraid of being branded racist and they agree with him. one mentioned al roker embarrassed himself. he
security hawk. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, r, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. \[applause] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. \[laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism, unabashed, unapologetic, i have to say sitting there it occurred to me somewhere the sea must be risin
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
our state department, and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> reporter: what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're considering you for the possibility of secretary of state. >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day, after hearing it from two reporters. and i'm pretty sure her reply was something along the lines of, not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton secretary of state designate. >> reporter: clinton was quickly confirmed. but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> so was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)

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